The Saints of Auriesville

St. Isaac Jogues

St. Isaac Jogues

St. Isaac Jogues was a French Jesuit priest who joined the missionaries in New France, Canada. While running supplies on the St. Lawrence River in 1642, he was captured along with St. René Goupil and taken to the Mohawk village of Ossernenon. Having survived gruesome brutalities, he was kept as a slave.

A man of profound humility and faith, he ministered to the captives and evangelized the Mohawks. With the help of Dutch settlers, he escaped to France only to return to Ossernenon as a peace ambassador. He was martyred on October 18, 1646 when a box of his belongings was blamed for crop pestilence.

St. René Goupil

St. René Goupil

St. René Goupil was a lay Jesuit, or donné, who served as a physician at the Jesuit missions in Quebec. Enroute to Huronia with Father Isaac Jogues in 1642, he was ambushed and taken to the Mohawk village of Ossernenon. He survived weeks of torture and was then enslaved in the village.

He was a compassionate man who tended the wounds of his tormentors. He was killed on September 29, 1642, while praying the rosary, because he had blessed a little boy with the sign of the cross. Buried by the loving hands of Father Jogues, René's holy relics rest in an unmarked grave in the Ravine on the Auriesville Shrine property.

St. John Lalande

St. John Lalande

St. John Lalande was a French teenager working as a donné at the Jesuit missions in Canada. He was Father Jogues' companion on the fated peace mission to Ossernenon. Father Jogues asked for someone who was "virtuous, docile to direction, courageous, one who would be willing to suffer anything for God." He was undeterred by the priest's description of what he ultimately endured as a captive.

St. John was martyred on October 19, 1646 when he attempted to recover the slain body of Father Jogues from the paths of the village.

Kateri Tekakwitha

Bl. Kateri Tekakwitha

Kateri Tekakwitha was born in Ossernenon ten years after the martyrdom of St. Isaac Jogues. As a child she was scarred and nearly blinded by small pox. During the hours she spent alone, God developed in her a deep sense of mysticism, purity and charity. After her baptism she lived an intense devotion to the Eucharist as a consecrated virgin. Because her health was compromised by penances and untiring service to others, she died on April 17, 1680 at age 24 whispering the names of Jesus and Mary. Upon her death, the small pox scars miraculously disappeared.

Year of Faith Vatican II 50 Years

St. Kateri Tekakwitha Pray for Us